Twitter Facebook Vimeo

General Publications and Resources

Also see ICOS annual reports.

Diverse Voices intercultural training pack for working with international students

'Diverse Voices: Listening to International Students' coverOutline: Intercultural competency is a skill increasingly required of all higher education staff. ICOS' 'Diverse Voices: Listening to International Students' DVD and training guide is an unparalleled resource for use across the sector, a thoroughly accessible tool for the efforts of higher education institutions to build receptive and empathetic environments for international students. Developed over a three year period by and launched in 2015, it brings together the experiences and perspectives of a range of international students on living and studying in Ireland. The pack is available for purchase (with a discount for members). Resources from the pack are used in the delivery in ICOS' intercultural training programme. »More information


Report on the findings of the ICOS and USI Focus Groups 2013

Consultation with international students on Ireland's International Education Strategy, based on focus groups held in Dublin, Cork and Galway. (December 2013) »View PDF


Listening to the Experience of International Students in Ireland - Dublin 2012

Report of a forum of international students held in Dublin in November 2012. »View PDF


Listening to the Experience of International Students in Ireland - Cork 2012

Report of a forum of international students held in Cork in February 2012. »View PDF


Code of Practice: 'Provision of Education for International Students'

Cover of the Code of Practice 'Provision of Education for International Students' Outline: Published in September 2009, the 'Code of Practice and Guidelines on the provision of education to International Students' was drawn up by a subcommittee appointed by the Irish Higher Education Quality Network. It sets out standards, guidelines and minimum requirements with respect to the following areas: Marketing and Recruitment; Enrolment Processes; Fees: Clarity, Support, Payment and Refunds; Orientation and Induction; Accommodation; Academic Matters; Student Support Services; Student Protection; Grievance and Appeal Procedures. »View PDF


International Students in Irish Higher Education - Forum Report 2007

Outline: ICOS' 2007 international students' forum aimed to build on the success of previous student fora, taking the event outside of Dublin for the first time. The forum brought together over 130 students from 30 countries studying at 20 different higher education institutions in Ireland. Presentations were followed by workshops focused on integration from both the international student and home student perspectives and at institutional and Irish government policies regarding international students. In 2008, ICOS released a detailed report of proceedings and workshop feedback. »View PDF


Chinese Students in Ireland

'Chinese Students in Ireland: New Opportunities, New Needs, New Challenges' compiles papers from the ICOS seminar held on 26th January 2001, edited by Wendy Cox and David Cameron, first published Dublin 2002. Papers include: 'Chinese students in Europe: the influence of culture and society' - Ms Yvonne Turner (University of Hertfordshire - UK); 'A Chinese Student in Ireland' - Ms Wanling Hou (Dublin City University); 'Chinese Students at Dublin Business School: some issues and questions' - Ms Liza Kelly (Dublin Business School); 'A Chinese Student in Ireland' - Mr Yu Hong (Dublin Business School); 'Chinese Postgraduates in Ireland: advantages, disadvantages and difficulties' - Dr Da-Wen Sun (University College Dublin). »View PDF


The Irish Are Friendly, But....

Overview: 'The Irish Are Friendly, But.... A Report on Racism and International Students in Ireland' by Gerard W. Boucher. This publication is based on a series of interviews conducted with international students in three universities in the Republic of Ireland during the European Year Against Racism 1997. The report situates the students'accounts in contexts both historical and contemporary, and offers a theoretical framework for understanding their experiences. Comparison is made with British and Dutch experiences, highlighting the absence of a comprehensive Irish policy framework and indicating examples of effective policies and practices. »View PDF